Posts

In 2012 while the olympic games were hosted in London, Storm Freerun released a great ad/video filmed and edited by Claudiu Voicu who also did the groundbreaking Storm Freerun Volume I. Read more

The way you present yourself as a coach has a direct impact on the experience your participants will have during a Parkour class. Read more

Insights into the possibilities of coaching parkour – experiences.

[blockquote align=center]

The following article and the interview are the result of a private session with a client. At this point I want to express a big thank you for doing the interview with me. My deepest respect goes to M. and her day to day accomplishements. – The german version of this article can be found here: https://www.we-trace.at/2018/11/22/parkour-ohne-sehen-und-hoeren

[/blockquote]

[columns] [span6]

Intro

M. gradually lost her sight when she was 10 – 13 years old. A few years after that she lost her sense of hearing. Ever since M. can´t see nor hear and has to rely on her other senses. She is 25 years now, studies law and approached me with the wish to try parkour.

Preparation

The biggest concern was communication. How do you communicate if you cannot talk or show what you intend to? How do you give feedback as a coach? I knew it was possible to write short words into M.’s palm but that would be a very limited way of communicating. I decided it would be best to outline the session beforehand so M. will know what will be going on during the training, what exercises will await her roughly and why we will be doing them. In written form and through the assistance of a special keyboard M. can read Braille on her computer. During the session I would rely on touch/and 1 word input through her palm.

Session

I planned the session in 3-4 parts:

Balance

Have you ever tried standing on one foot and closing your eyes? – Then you know it is hard as hell to keep your balance. For M. the heightened difficulty of balancing with no sight is her everyday life, so working on it came natural. We went to a spot with a huge circle of small bars. A bar is 3 steps long with a one step gap followed by the next bar-element. I gradually increased difficulty and it was inspiring to see how M. coped. In the beginning, it was all about standing on the rail with my assistance (both hands). After a while, and after taking a few steps, the distance she could walk was getting bigger. As the need for assistance decreased, we gradually removed one of my hands, leaving her with 1 hand to hold on. In terms of communication I introduced a small and quick double-squeeze of her hand to indicate that her next step would have to be bigger due to the gap between the bars. After a few failed tries she managed and the squeeze became a sort of warning for the rest of the session.

Spatial awareness I and movement memory

After balancing, we went to a set of short walls that formed a tight and enclosed space. The space was not bigger than 5×5 meters, much like a small room cramped with a couch and other potential obstacles. M. knew what the aim was, but I did not tell her exactly how the exercise would be. I guided her to the first wall and swiped across her palm in my direction. I don´t know if that was helpful but she sure did understand to follow me. I laid out a way for us. First it was simple without any special moves, just using the walls as a guide rail entering the “maze” and exiting it again. After a few rounds, I introduced the possibility to cross over walls, thus changing the way we did. M. managed automatically with a (most of times) controlled step-vault. We did a few rounds of the new line, me gradually and intently moving away from her, not providing her with much guidance. At some point I waited for her at the start and wrote in her palm “ALONE”: meaning, she should go for it on her own for the first time. M. remembered all the corners, all the direction changes, all the dangers (screws sticking out of the walls, uneven floor,…). She moved swiftly and followed the path perfectly. I moved with her, but she didn´t know. It was just in case she fell, so I could spot her.

Spatial awareness II

The next part took place on a concrete wall that went from ground level up to neck height. 2 feet wide and about 40 meters long, forming a route that went around a set of trees. The aim was to get M. to walk the whole thing alone navigating the edges of the wall with her feet, preventing a fall by doing so. Most blind people use hands and their stick to navigate, usually (this is just my observation) dragging their feet behind. I remember one of my first sessions training blind on intent with Phil from Germany, who visited Linz back in the days. It was pouring rain and Phil introduced me to blind training along a given route (with sharp drops in some places, should we fall). I was shit scared but we worked it out and we got pretty fast at the route after several tries. A technique we used was the one I wanted to show M.. We had the weight on the back foot quickly scanning the area in front of us with the front foot. If we hit concrete, we knew we could step there, if we felt the edge we knew the drop was there. For M. the exercise was hard, because parkour people are used to moving on the balls of their feet. For someone with no experience in parkour the heel is where the weight is, so navigating with the front foot was hard because the weight was already on it. I think this can be trained and will be of benefit. So this was my feedback I gave M. in the end as well.

Strength training

The last part of our session was exhausting. Climbing down and up a set of four walls. It was a straight line but for M., who mainly moves on flat surfaces, it was exhausting. I hope we broke a little barrier by ascending and descending these walls and I hope it gave her confidence in her skills and a sense of what she is capable of.

[/span6][span6]

 

Interview

Can you tell us more about your illness and how it developed? To my knowledge you were in good health until the age of 10. What happened?

In my early childhood I got diagnosed with Retinitis pigmentosa. According to stories, I stumbled a lot since I was four years old. I seemed to could not make out obstacles. Our latest guess is that the illness was caused by a failed vaccination. I haven´t really sensed anything wrong with me then, but the worse it got the more scared I seemed to have gotten as a child. One of my earliest childhood memories is me sitting on the street on a summer day, observing ants – I could practically count them. Or another time, when I was driving to my grandparents place in an evening and where we came across a church that was lit. It was disturbing for me that I slowly couldn’t see that anymore. And yet, my brain has treasured all these memories, as if I had known back then that at some point memories is all that I will have left.

Until the age of 10 I could see comparably normal but it was already bad at that time. But I had a sort of vision where I could see blurred outlines and where I could work with conventional writing. A year later this was not possible anymore and I had to learn Braille (something that felt easy to me). I sometimes wonder, if my eyes lost their training once I used Braille and if that´s the reason my vision faded so rapidly after that.

As far as I know the weakened sense of hearing is part of the illness. This has developed slower though. The acute hearing loss (Hörsturz) came 2011.

How did you get the wish to try out parkour?

Over the internet. Coincidently I stumbled across parkour on a website and was fascinated. I have read a lot about it and the wish to try it came soon. I did not have any hope of being able to try parkour at all, but after having shared this wish with a friend of mine one led to the other. In May I got a glimpse of parkour, when a friend of that friend showed me. Shortly after that I found the link to your website (Parkour Austria).

What were your expectations for your first parkour training?

I´ll be honest, I had little expectations. As mentioned, I was rather skeptical because I had no idea if it would work at all. But I have to say I am reliefed and satisfied that everything worked out well in the end.

What is your impression of your first parkour training?

I have the feeling of repeating myself 🙂 – As said, I was surprised that it worked out that well. For instance, the weather was not the best, but I barely noticed it during the session. I was focussed and in the moment and could switch off for 1,5 hours. In my everyday life that is quite hard to do, that´s also why I enjoyed this time so much. Sure, communication is a bit complicated and it’s hard to do everything as intended, but I have the feeling this will improve over time.

Is there anything else you want to say?

I hope to do Parkour regularly now. It has gripped me and I´d be happy to make it a hobby I can do besides my studies. I am happy with this first chance of trying parkour. THANK YOU!

[/span6][/columns]

 

Ein Einblick in die Möglichkeiten mit Parkour zu unterrichten – Erfahrungen.

[blockquote align=center]

Der folgende Artikel mit nebenstehendem Interview ist aus einem Privattraining mit einer Klientin entstanden. Ich möchte an dieser Stelle meinen Dank für die Bereitschaft zum Interview ausdrücken und meine Hochachtung vor dem was M. in ihrem täglichen Leben leistet. Der Artikel findet sich hier auch auf Englisch: https://www.we-trace.at/2018/11/22/novision_nohearing_parkour

[/blockquote]

[columns] [span6]

Intro

Als M. 10 Jahre alt war, verlor sie über einen Zeitraum von ca. 3 Jahren allmählich ihren Sehsinn. Mehrere Jahre danach verlor sie ihren Hörsinn. M. ist 25 Jahre alt, studiert Recht und kam mit dem Wunsch Parkour auszuprobieren auf mich zu.

Vorbereitung

Die größte Herausforderung war Kommunikation. Wie verständigt man sich, wenn man weder sprechen noch (vor-)zeigen kann? Wie gibt man als Coach das richtige Feedback? Ich wusste, dass man einfache Wörter in M.´s Hand schreiben kann, aber diese Kommunikationsform hat deutliche Grenzen. Um M. bestmöglich auf das kommende Training vorzubereiten, entschloss ich eine Grobfassung meines Trainingsplanes zu verschriftlichen. So sollte sichergestellt werden, dass M. weiß worauf sie sich einlassen wird. In schriftlicher Form kann M. mit der Hilfe einer speziellen Tastatur Braille am Computer lesen. Während des Trainings würde ich mich auf Berührungen und Ein-Wort-inputs in M.´s Handfläche verlassen.

Session

Das Training wurde in 3-4 Teilen geplant:

Balance

Wer schon einmal probiert hat auf einem Bein zu stehen und dann seine Augen zu schließen, weiß wie schwer das ist. Für M. ist der Verzicht auf den Sehsinn und damit die stark erhöhte Schwierigkeit der Balance Realität. Diese Situationen aktiv zu trainieren war eines meiner Ziele. Wir gingen zu einem bekannten Spot, der aus einer großen Kreisformation aus ca. 3 Fuß langen Stangen besteht, die in Abständen von jeweils ca. 1 Fuß zueinander stehen. Das Stehen auf der Stange unter Zuhilfenahme beider meiner Hände war schnell gemeistert. Nach und nach bekam M. das Selbstbewusstsein mehrere Schritte zu setzen, auch wenn das mit den „Löchern“ im geplanten Weg schwierig war. Die Veränderung der Hilfestellung erhöhte den Schwierigkeitsgrad zudem erneut, als ich mich zur Seite bewegte und eine Hand entfernte. Über die Übung hinweg etablierte sich außerdem eine Art Warnzeichen, ein doppeltes kurzes Drücken beider Hände, um M. auf einen nahenden Spalt (also das Ende eines Stangenelementes) hinzuweisen. Dieses Zeichen sollte sich über den Rest des Trainings bewähren.

Räumliche Wahrnehmung I und Erinnerungsvermögen

Ein Spot, der aus 6-8 Betonelementen bestand, formte einen kleinen abgeschlossenen Bereich. Nicht größer als ein 5x5Meter Wohnzimmer. In diesem Bereich, den wir zuerst behutsam erkundeten, legte ich M. Routen vor, die sie gegen Ende der Übung hin selbstständig wiederholen sollte. Durch das anfängliche Erkunden und vertraut werden mit dem Spot, wusste M. sehr schell über jede Unebenheit und jede Mauer Bescheid. Nachdem ich anfangs vorausgegangen war, überließ ich ab einem gewissen Zeitpunkt M. die Navigation durch den kleinen Bereich. Dabei wiederholte sie Routen, die wir zuvor gemeinsam begangen sind. Manchmal führten diese Routen auch über Mauern, die sie wie von selbst unter Anwendung von kontrollierten Step-Vaults hinter sich ließ. Bei dieser Übung kam schnell zum Vorschein, dass M. über ein starkes Erinnerungsvermögen und eine geschulte Raumwahrnehmung verfügt, denn auch ich hatte in der Vorbereitung der Session an mir selbst getestet, wie es ist, ohne Sehsinn die geplanten Routen zu gehen.

Räumliche Wahrnehmung II

Auf einem ca. 40cm breiten Mauersims, der in verschiedenen Höhen um ein Baumbeet gelegt wurde, sollte M. selbstständig um den Baum navigieren, ohne von dem Sims zu fallen. Dabei war der Fokus auf die Nutzung der eigenen Füße als Tastorgan zum Erkennen der Ecken und Kanten und somit dem Vermeiden eines Falls. Die meisten Blinden (meine Beobachtung) verlassen sich eher auf Hilfsmittel wie den Blindenstock oder die eigenen Hände. Die Füße spielen dabei eine eher nebensächliche Rolle. Für M. war das Vortasten mit den Füßen anfänglich schwierig, da das Gewicht meist auf der Ferse platziert war. Somit war ein Herantasten an den Untergrund ohne gleichzeitig das Gewicht auf den tastenden Fuß zu geben schwierig. Für Parkourtrainierende ist es normal, sich auf den Fußballen zu bewegen, und auch jene Parkourleute mit denen ich eine ähnliche Übung gemacht habe, nutzten ihre Fußballen zum Tasten ohne das Gewicht auf den tastenden Fuß zu geben. Erst wenn die Zone vor dem Fuß als sicher erachtet/ertastet wurde, wird der Schritt gesetzt und der Prozess wiederholt. Ich hoffe, dass diese Übung zur Meisterung des Alltags von M. relevant war.

Krafttraining

Der letzte Teil der Session war anstrengend. In einer geraden Linie wurden 4 Mauern nach unten überwunden um sich danach wieder nach oben zu kämpfen. Für jemanden, der sich meist auf flachem Terrain bewegt eine schwierige Aufgabe. Ich hoffe jedoch, dass das Überwinden dieser Mauern einen Beitrag zu einem stärkeren Selbstbewusstsein geleistet hat, vor allem wenn es darum geht zu evaluieren wozu man selbst in der Lage ist.

[/span6][span6]

Interview

Kannst du uns kurz etwas zu deinem Krankheitsverlauf erzählen? Meines Wissens nach warst du bis zu deinem 10. Lebensjahr gesund? Was ist passiert?

Bei mir wurde in frühester Kindheit Retinitis pigmentosa festgestellt (heißt inzwischen anders). Laut Erzählungen bin ich schon mit vier Jahren durch die Gegend gestolpert, habe Hindernisse nicht wahrgenommen etc. Unsere jüngste Vermutung ist, dass die Erkrankung durch eine schief gegangene Impfung verursacht wurde. Ich habe das alles aber am Anfang gar nicht so wahrgenommen und mir auch nichts weiter gedacht, obwohl ich mit zunehmender Verschlechterung immer verängstigter gewesen sein dürfte. Eine meiner frühesten Kindheitserinnerungen ist, dass ich im Sommer auf der Straße sitze und Ameisen beobachte – ich konnte sie praktisch zählen. Oder wenn ich abends zu meinen Großeltern gefahren bin, führte der Weg an einer Kirche vorbei, die abends/nachts immer beleuchtet war. Dass ich das alles dann nach und nach nicht mehr sehen konnte, war schon verstörend. Und doch hat mein Gehirn viele dieser Erinnerungen abgespeichert – so als hätte es schon damals gewusst, dass mir irgendwann nichts anderes mehr bleibt als die Erinnerungen.

Bis zu meinem 10. Lebensjahr konnte ich noch vergleichsweise gut sehen, obwohl es natürlich schon damals ziemlich schlecht war. Aber immerhin hatte ich noch einen Sehtest und konnte verschwommen Umrisse ausmachen und sogar noch mit der normalen Schrift arbeiten. Aber ein Jahr später ging das alles dann nicht mehr und ich musste anfangen, die Brailleschrift zu lernen (was mir ziemlich leicht gefallen sein dürfte). Ich frage mich manchmal, ob es an der Tatsache liegt, dass meine Augen nicht mehr “trainiert” wurden, sobald ich begonnen habe, die Brailleschrift zu lernen, und deshalb die Sehkraft dann relativ schnell nachgelassen hat.

Soweit ich das verstanden habe, gehört die Hörschwäche zur Krankheit. Die hat sich allerdings deutlich langsamer verschlechtert. Der große Hörsturz kam erst 2011.

Wie bist du auf die Idee gekommen Parkour auszuprobieren?

Tatsächlich übers Internet. Ich bin rein zufällig auf einer Seite darüber gestolpert und war sofort fasziniert, habe dann einiges darüber gelesen und immer mehr den Wunsch gefasst, das selbst einmal auszuprobieren. Ich hatte aber lange Zeit nicht wirklich Hoffnung, dass das überhaupt gehen könnte, habe mich dann aber doch mal einer Freundin damit anvertraut und so kam dann eines zum anderen. Ich habe im Mai einmal kurz bei einem Bekannten dieser Freundin reingeschnuppert und später dann den Link zu eurer Homepage erhalten.

Welche Erwartungen hattest du an dein erstes Parkour Training?

Ehrlich gesagt bin ich eher ohne große Erwartungen an die Sache herangegangen. Wie schon erwähnt, war ich eher skeptisch, weil ich nicht wusste, ob das überhaupt klappen kann. Aber ich muss sagen, dass ich hinterher mehr als zufrieden und auch erleichtert war, dass es dann doch so gut funktioniert hat.

Welchen Eindruck hattest du von deinem ersten Training?

Ich habe irgendwie das Gefühl, dass ich mich ständig wiederhole 🙂 Wie gesagt, ich war überrascht, dass es so gut funktioniert hat. Es waren beispielsweise nicht die besten Wetterverhältnisse, aber das habe ich während des Trainings kaum wahrgenommen. Ich war konzentriert und ganz bei der Sache, konnte für 1,5 Stunden komplett abschalten und einfach im Moment leben. Das ist im Alltag eher schwierig, daher habe ich die Zeit wirklich sehr genossen. Klar, mit der Kommunikation ist es etwas schwierig und sicher nicht leicht, alles so zu machen, wie es sein sollte. Aber ich denke, mit der Zeit würde sich das immer besser einspielen.

Gibt es irgendetwas was du sagen möchtest?

Ich hoffe, dass ich Parkour ab jetzt möglichst regelmäßig machen kann. Es hat mich einfach gepackt und ich würde mich freuen, wenn das ein Hobby werden könnte, das ich neben meinem Studium regelmäßig betreiben kann. Auf jeden Fall bin ich sehr dankbar, dass mir diese Chance auf das erste Training gegeben wurde. DANKE dafür!

[/span6][/columns]

 

For us it was a great adventure hiking along the Odontotos railway tracks. I hope to be able to transport some of the impressions we got. Other than that if you aim on doing the trip yourself you can read this as a sort of guide with good info on what will await you. In either case: enjoy.

 

Table of contents

Intro
The train
The village of Kalavryta
The monastery – Mega Spileo
The hike
Summary

 

 

Intro

In the north east of Peloponnes (Greece) lies the village of Diakofto (Διακοφτό), directly next to the sea. Having travelled through Greece, Diakofto in my opinion is neither especially beautiful nor has to offer great beaches. It is neither overly touristic nor “typical greek”. Diakofto has to offer something uniquely special though.

A few times a day it is the starting point for the so called Odontotos train connecting Diakofto with a small village in the mountains called Kalavryta.

 

The train

Odontotos is a single track railway covering 700 height meters from sea level and runs through steep and tight passages, through tight and dark tunnels and over impressive metal bridges leaving no space for a floor to see if you dare look out the window when it crosses one of these. The trains primary means of motion is its Diesel engine with a solid 25 km/h average speed. Because of the steepness of the railway it has to rely on its “teeth” – thus its name Odontotos (originating from Dontia, meaning teeth in greek). The secondary motion system (rack railway) springs into action every once in a while, the average speed around 6 – 10km/h. The whole scenic trip to Kalavryta takes around 1 hour with a station in Zachlorou.

 

The village of Kalavryta (Καλάβρυτα)

At the end of the train line you will find beautiful, yet touristic Kalavryta. It is perfect for families and elderly people and fairly priced. Straying off the used paths of tourists and looking around a little we found great spots to train (Parkour) even at this remote mountain village. The village itself seems to be active in winter as well as Kalavryta seems to be a winter vacation location too, which is rarely seen in Greece. After a coffee and some training we waited in the historic train station for Odontotos to carry us back down to Zachlorou from where we would start our hike to Diakofto again. The part between Kalavryta and Zachlorou is not as eventful to hike so we left that out and saving our energy, also knowing we would still hike for 6 hours if we wanted to include the monastery Megaleo Spilaio.

 

The monastery – Mega Spileo

We got off at Zachlorou and started our ascent. It took us an hour to get to the monastery, because we got off track at one point and had to retrace our route to find where we went wrong. No biggie, but it cost us a few minutes. The monastery itself is huge. It’s carved into the mountain and can be visited for free (2 euros for their museum if you want to see that). Inside the 8 story monastery is a cavelike yard with trees and a few beams of sunlight. We grabbed a coffee at the touristic tavern with a beautiful view over the valley before heading to Zachlorou again for descending to Diakofto by foot.

 

The hike

We did the ~13 to 15km in ~3 – 4 hours, walking slow and steady, taking pictures of the amazing view. The hike is nothing less than a spectacle. But you need to be prepared. As some passages of the tracks are so narrow that a hiker would not fit at the same time with the train, I strongly advice to keep the timetable of departures of the Odontotos in mind. If you estimate the time the train needs to reach you, you can find a comfortable spot to let the train pass and wait it out. Worst case would be meeting it up on one of those bridges or in a tunnel, that would suck. We got assured though that in the worst case the train can stop and the hikers need to back up to let the train pass. I doubt the drivers ability to make a full break in the tunnels though.

 

In our case there was only 1 train left going that day and after our first 20 minutes hiking we comfortably waited for it to pass by. After that we knew the tracks were free. Another thing to consider while hiking is rock slides and falling stones. In the narrow passages we chose to move quick and steady instead of staying at a spot for too long, because the possibility of falling rocks and stones is existent. In fact, this was the major concern when I asked the train driver for advice on the hike. And the existence of the problem was proven to us when the way of the Odontotos was blocked by a rock that had to be removed by two employees from the railway company the time we rode the train up. So no joking around in potentially dangerous spots or passages. We took our short breaks in the safety of the tunnels or in open passages. The third thing to watch out for at this adventure are the bridges and how to cross them. The bridges can be dangerous.

 

There is no safety for hikers because they were not intended for them to hike on. They are rusty, old and falling would mean certain death. But they do hold the train, of course, so once you have figured out the stable parts of the bridge crossing becomes easy. It’s nothing I would recommend children, or elderly people to do, so don´t think that´s a trip you can do with young children, but if I knew my children are disciplined and can follow my lead I´d take them (probably 14 years and up). When crossing the bridges I chose to do it on the steel beams. Not on the thin layer of rusting metal to the sides, that give you the wrong impression of safety just because you can´t see the drop. Neither on the wooden parts floating in mid air hat are suspended in the middle. Crossing on the steel beams and holding onto the guard rail with the hands is quite safe if you are not stupid. And if you don´t lose respect or become ignorant of the potential danger after crossing 20 of these bridges you will be fine. The hike is by the way quite tiring for the feet as the ground is 90% mid sized rocks and pebbles. Your only relief is walking on the wooden parts of the flat parts of the railway tracks and making awkwardly small steps for kilometers or actually balancing on the rail as we did a few times.

 

Summary

If you got a day and want to spend it on an adventure in the mountains of Greece, Diakofto – Kalavryta is the place to be. If you can handle the bridges and the train schedule you are good to go 🙂 The hike itself is not (yet) illegal, you can even find it in some travel guides and you can ask about it at the train station of Diakofto.

More information on the Odontotos train can be found at:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diakofto%E2%80%93Kalavryta_Railway

https://odontotos.com/

 

And if you want to see great art from my fellow travel partner check out:

https://www.instagram.com/sou.slikart/

https://de-de.facebook.com/pg/souslikart

On June 9th 2018 we invited Sébastien Foucan over to Vienna to teach workshops for Parkour Austria. In between there was a lengthy Q and A session we recordedto video.

Enjoy 🙂

[kad_youtube url=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=obe_TM3jWLc” ]